Dr Johnson as representative of the character of the eighteenth century.
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Dr Johnson as representative of the character of the eighteenth century.

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Published by F. E. Robinson in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Johnson, Samuel, -- 1709-1784

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesThe Chancellor"s English essay prize -- 1899
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13913661M

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  JOHNSON () Or THE AGE OF TRANSITION General Characteristics of the Age Although Dr. Samuel Johnson is the representative writer of the second half of the eighteenth century, the age under discussion is better known as a transitional period, an era of change from pseudo-classicism to romanticism.   Samuel Johnson (author of the subject of a previous blogpost, The Vanity of Human Wishes, and a tremendously important figure in the eighteenth-century literary scene) approvingly described Mary Jones as ‘The Chantress’. Whether he meant this in terms of poetic ‘chanting’ or as an ‘enchantress’, or both, is perhaps open to debate; what is certain, however, is that this poem is pure eighteenth-century .   The Age of Johnson () The later half of the eighteenth century, which was dominated by Dr. Samuel Johnson, is called the Age of Johnson. The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. () by James Boswell is a biography of English writer Dr. Samuel Johnson. The work was from the beginning a critical and popular success, and represents a landmark in the development of the modern genre of biography. It is notable for its extensive reports of Johnson's conversation.

Take our walking tour guide to one of London's most famous eighteenth century characters, Dr Johnson, and the beautiful house he lived in. His best-known work is his 'Dictionary of the English Language'. Samuel Johnson was born in Lichfield, Staffordshire, on 18 September His father . ENL The Age of Johnson. CRADDOCK. In the history of British literature, the second half of the "long eighteenth century"--roughly has been called by several titles, such as the Enlightenment, the Pre-Romantic period, the Georgian age, and the Age of Johnson. It is highly appropriate that Dr Samuel Johnson, the very model of an eighteenth-century literary man, as famous in his own time as in ours, should have published his Dictionary at the very beginning of the heyday of the middle class. Johnson was a poet and critic who raised common sense to the heights of .

Doctor Johnson is not, perhaps, precisely the type of humanist so much needed in our present welter of opinions; but his personality is so impressive, his general ideas upon life are so sound, and his thoroughgoing common sense so refreshing, that an adequate study of his intellectual life may well become of very real value to many who are groping for permanent standards by which they may. Dr. Johnson: He was the greatest English man of letters between Pope and Wordsworth. He was born in Lichfield in His father was a book seller. He was always sick. He was a pessimist. He did some translation for a Birmingham publisher. He married a widow twenty years elder to him.   The later half of the eighteenth century, which was dominated by Dr. Samuel Johnson, is called the Age of Johnson. Johnson died in , and from that time the Classical spirit in English literature began to give place to the Romantic spirit, though officially the Romantic Age started from the year when Wordsworth and Coleridge published. However, the level of detail included in the work makes it a valuable resource on Samuel Johnson and the eighteenth century. Samuel Johnson is born in in a room above his father’s bookshop. His mother, Sarah, is 40 years old when Johnson is born, and due to the lateness of the pregnancy, she is attended by a respected surgeon. Johnson is sickly at birth and it is feared that he will not live, so a .